EPISODE 123

A Scared cop is a Dangerous Cop

 

Oct 15, 2022 | Podcast

Police Officers training on the firing range at night with red and blue lights

There are people who believe that inserting the police in a situation makes things worse. Are they right? In this solo episode from Mike, he looks at the perils of the “fear biter” and the negative effects of an unmanaged fight or flight response on decision making skills. Stress management is important, and it can’t be learned in a PowerPoint class.

The most notorious manifestation of this phenomenon is the “’Oh Sh*t!’ Bang”, where a scared or startled cop results in a lawful-but-awful shooting that might have been avoided by better stress management and more confidence in the officer’s physical skills. However, Mike also explains the many other places that the poorly managed limbic response can rear its ugly head: Bad communication in stressful situations, indecision or half-decisions that allow a developing situation to get much worse, and more.

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Intro music credit Bensound.com

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